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Showing 311–320 of 2053 results

Cost of Revolution: Strolers Performing Hamlet Before the Squire

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Cost of Revolution: Timothy Tallow and His Wife Going to Graves Hall on a Sunday 

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Cost of Revolution: An Old Macaroni Critic at a New Play

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Cost of Revolution: Refin’d Taste

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Cost of Revolution: The Coterie & Newmarket Macaroni

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Cost of Revolution: Part 2 American War

Soon after graduating from college in 1775, Richard Mansergh St. George followed his family’s tradition and joined the British Army. The growing “rebellion” in America provided him with a stage to show his courage and zeal. Men from the nobility or landed gentry, such as St. George, made up about a quarter of the British Army’s regimental officers. They could afford to purchase officer commissions and move up in rank. Unlike St. George, most British officers were the sons of tradesmen, clergymen, and professionals who had little wealth and few prospects of inheritance. They often looked to military service to maintain their fragile social status. In 1776, St. George purchased an ensign’s commission in the 4th Regiment of Foot and sailed for America to defend the British Empire.
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Cost of Revolution: Recruiting in Ireland

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Cost of Revolution: A Soldier’s Best Friend

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Cost of Revolution: Outfitting an Officer

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Cost of Revolution: 4th Regiment of Foot Commission

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