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Cocked hats (hats with the three sides of the brim turned up) like this one were popular in civilian and military life throughout the 1700s. They later came to be called “tricorns.” Old stitching holes reveal that this hat was reshaped from a 1770s style into its current shape. The hat belonged to either Thomas Noyes III (born 1729) or his son, also named Thomas (born 1754), of Essex County, Massachusetts. Both father and son served in the Massachusetts militia during the Revolutionary War. A label inside the crown has the name Luther Noyes written on it and refers to a later owner who may have been a descendant of Thomas Noyes.

Object Details

  • Cocked Hat
    Probably Massachusetts
    1775-1800
    Felt, Linen, Pewter
    Museum of the American Revolution
    2017.29.01

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Thomas Noyes's Pocketbook
 

Thomas Noyes's Pocketbook

This decoratively stitched pocketbook Thomas Noyes III or his son, also named Thomas, who both served in the Massachusetts militia during the Revolutionary War.
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Image 111120 Collection 52 Thomas Noyess Musket
 

Thomas Noyes's Musket

This musket, with the initials “TN” are carved on the lock-side, belonged to either Thomas Noyes III or his son, also named Thomas, who both served in the Massachusetts militia during the Revolutionary War.
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Image 091120 Fringed Linen Shirt Collection Hunting Shirt
 

Linen Hunting Shirt

This uniquely American hunting shirt, which were worn by many riflemen from the mid-Atlantic area, originated in the Virginia backcountry.
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