Read the Revolution

curated collection of excerpts from exciting, thought-provoking books about the American Revolution

First Ladies of the Republic
March 25, 2020

First Ladies of the Republic

Although the term “First Lady” was not adopted until the later 19th century, Jeanne Abrams’s recent work, First Ladies of the Republic (2018) suggests that America’s early presidential wives — Martha Washington, Abigail Adams, and Dolley Madison — were the first to pioneer this role, creating the “distinctly American quasi-political” position of First Lady. Each of these women, Abrams argues, wielded some degree of political power and helped shape national identity as part of what Abrams refers to as a family unit.

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The Boston Massacre: A Family Story
March 11, 2020

The Boston Massacre

There are two popular interpretations of the shooting that took place in Boston in March 1770: the first takes after Paul Revere’s rendering of a bloody, violent massacre — the Boston Massacre — while the second derives from John Adams, who, as the lawyer defending the soldiers in court, portrayed the soldiers as the victims and not the perpetrators of the event. But Serena Zabin’s recent work, The Boston Massacre: A Family History, suggests there is a third interpretation. She tells a different story — a story of the people.

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Cost of Revolution Catalog Cover
February 26, 2020

Cost of Revolution

Italian artist Xavier della Gatta painted two realistic Revolutionary battle scenes in 1782, the Battle of Paoli and the Battle of Germantown. Collected by the Valley Forge Historical Society in 1957, both paintings came to the Museum of the American Revolution with the rest of the Historical Society’s collections. Famous for their accurate depictions of equipment, troop locations, and actions, there was still a lot about them that was not known. For instance, how did an Italian artist with no known connection to America paint such realistic scenes while the war was still raging? Enter Richard St. George, the focus of the Museum’s special exhibition, Cost of Revolution: The Life and Death of An Irish Soldier.

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Tacky's Revolt by Vincent Brown
February 12, 2020

Tacky's Revolt

Harvard historian Vincent Brown’s latest book, Tacky’s Revolt: The Story of an Atlantic Slave War, is all about entangled histories. The book tells the story of the largest slave revolt in the British Empire during the 1700s; a bloody conflict in Jamaica that few modern Americans know much about. Brown does not share this story to simply increase awareness of Tacky’s Revolt (1760-1761). Instead, he encourages his readers to think about the conflict not only as a local insurrection, but as a major battle in a centuries-long slave war that links the histories of Africa, the Americas, and Europe.

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Turncoat by Stephen Brumwell
January 22, 2020

Turncoat

Benedict Arnold has fascinated Americans for two centuries. The drama surrounding one of the Continental Army’s most accomplished generals defecting to the British Army makes a good story that has been told in books, films, and recently on television. Historian Stephen Brumwell’s new research into Arnold’s life, his letters, and the writings of his contemporaries has yielded the latest study of America’s most famous traitor. Turncoat: Benedict Arnold and the Crisis of American Liberty, published in 2018, provides a fresh perspective on Arnold’s personality and his sense of honor.

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Frontier Rebels
January 8, 2020

Frontier Rebels

Many historians point to the Stamp Act in March of 1765 as one of the pivotal events that caused the American Revolution. In his recent work, Frontier Rebels: The Fight for Independence in the American West, 1765-1776, Patrick Spero turns our attention away from this more traditional, urban story of the coming of the Revolution and instead focuses on the western American frontier. He argues that in order to understand the origins of the American Revolution, we must move beyond events like the Stamp Act and study the central role the frontier played in shaping opposition against the British Empire.

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December 18, 2019

Museum of the American Revolution Official Guidebook

From the day the Museum of the American Revolution opened, guests asked if there was a book available that captured the spirit of our core exhibition. This past July, the Museum released our Official Guidebook, which captures that spirit, highlighting some of the more memorable moments in the exhibition.

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British Soldiers American War by Don Hagist
December 11, 2019

British Soldiers, American War

Caught in the midst of loading his musket at the Battle of Long Island in August 1776, Private William Burke of the British Army’s 45th Regiment of Foot is the subject of one of the Museum of the American Revolution’s life-sized figure tableaux. Such dramatic scenes help to bring the people of the American Revolution to life in the museum’s core exhibition. Burke’s personal memory of fighting in America as a young man, which inspired the tableau, and his eventual desertion from the army is one of nine stories featured in this week’s Read the Revolution book, Don Hagist’s British Soldiers, American War: Voices of the American Revolution.

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Among His Troops Catalog cover
November 27, 2019

Among His Troops

In July 2019, the Museum of the American Revolution released our first book, Among His Troops: Discovering the Only Known Image of Washington’s Tent, an expanded catalog based on the special exhibition of the same name. The catalog focuses on two of Pierre L’Enfant’s watercolors, one depicting the Continental Army at West Point and the other showing the army’s encampment at Verplanck’s Point, New York. L’Enfant’s Verplanck’s Point watercolor includes the only known war-time image of Washington’s tent, which is in the Museum’s collection and on display. The catalog also includes an overview of Washington’s time under canvas from just before the French and Indian War through the Revolution, an illustrated explanation of each watercolor, original objects from each of the encampments, and full-size reproductions of both watercolors.

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The Will of the People by T.H. Breen
November 13, 2019

The Will of the People

There is no single Revolutionary story. In The Will of the People: The Revolutionary Birth of America, T. H. Breen unearths surprising tales of the everyday people and local communities whose participation in the American Revolution helped sustain the war effort. Breen identifies seven stages of Revolution, including rejection, assurance, fear, justice, betrayal, revenge, and reconciliation. His formulation helps restore human passion to the traditional narrative of the American Revolution, providing an alternative understanding of the conflict to those that focus solely on either lofty ideas or gritty realities.

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