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Showing 11–20 of 541 results for Women's History Month

Picturing Washington's Army: Verplanck’s Point

Pierre Charles L’Enfant’s watercolor of the encampment at Verplanck’s Point (August-October 1782) depicts the Continental Army at its professional best. Wooden bowers, or shades made of tree branches, decorated the long line of soldiers’ tents. Washington’s marquee tent stood on a hill where it “towered, predominant” over the camp, as one eyewitness put it.

For a month, the Continental troops at Verplanck’s Point gathered firewood for the coming winter and drilled for the next campaign. On September 22, the Continental Army demonstrated their fighting readiness for French forces marching from Virginia through the Hudson Highlands. One astonished French officer admired the transformation of an army that had “formerly had no other uniform than a cap, on which was written Liberty.” 

Image: Museum of the American Revolution, Gift of the Landenberger Family Foundation

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When Women Lost the Vote: A Revolutionary Story: PLG - Chester Township, Burlington County, New Jersey, October 1807

Chester Township, Burlington County, New Jersey, October 1807


This is a transcription of a poll list from a state election held at a schoolhouse in Moorestown, Chester Township, in October 1807. This list of voters includes the names of 38 women that cast their ballots just one month before the New Jersey State Legislature passed a bill defining voters as white, male citizens. The closing of the electorate effectively stripped the vote from women and free people of color in New Jersey.


A number of voters on this list have yet to be identified. As the Museum of the American Revolution continues its research, please contact us if you know more about any of the voters. Share your research with us.

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The Davenport Letters: May 22, Year Unknown

This letter does not include a year. James Davenport’s letters and his memoirs indicate that he was at West Point in May 1779, 1780, and 1782, so it is unclear in which year he wrote this one. John Davenport, who transcribed this letter in the 1850s, numbered it as the second letter, between Isaac How Davenport’s two, but James was at Valley Forge, not West Point, in May 1778.

James Davenport was born in 1759 and apprenticed to a local shoemaker. In 1776, he enlisted in a militia unit and then in the Continental Army in February 1777. In April 1777, he began several months of campaigning in New York that eventually took him to the Battle of Saratoga in September. He spent that winter at Valley Forge with the main Continental Army, where, according to his memoir, “huts and cells were built to dwell in during the winter, as commodious as place and circumstances would allow.” After a brief illness and recovery away from camp, he was inoculated for smallpox, as a result of which he “had a siege of it; but I came off conqueror.” In 1778 and 1779, he fought at the Battle of Monmouth, endured a series of illnesses, and saw active service in New York before gaining a furlough in December 1779.

In this undated letter, he complains about the minimal daily rations that Continental soldiers sometimes received: in this case, half a pound of bread, a gill (four ounces, or half a cup) of peas, and “a little stinking shad,” a type of fish. May was a hard month in army encampments because there was little fresh food available, and stores put up the previous summer and fall would be running low and spoiling.

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A desktop computer showing the Timeline of the American Revolution with a succulent and mug next to the computer

Timeline of the American Revolution

Explore the history of the American Revolution through objects, artifacts, and documents from the Museum's collection that were there.
Explore the Timeline

Celebrate Legacy-Making Ladies During Women’s History Month at Museum’s History After Hours Event

History After Hours hosts an event celebrating the stories of women during the American Revolution in honor of Women's History Month.
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Katelyn Appiah-Kubi portrays Elizabeth Freeman wearing a blue dress with white apron and hat.

Black History Month

Celebrate Black History Month and explore the stories of unsung Revolutionaries with the Museum this February.
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Image 102220 Nastassia Parker

History Explorers Club: Who Was Ona Judge?

February 27, 2021 from 11:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
In celebration of Black History Month, dig into the story of Ona Judge, a woman who escaped enslavement from the home of President George Washington.
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Explore Eliza Hamilton’s 18th-Century Fashion with a Panel Discussion and Fashion Demonstration

A panel discussion and fashion show on 18th-century women's clothing, the cumulation of the Museum's "Fashioning Eliza" project
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Discover Black Voters in Early New Jersey with Virtual Event, Feb. 25

Local “History Detectives” Will Join Museum Curators for a Discussion on Recovering Lost Black History During Black History Month
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Nastassia Parker as Ona Judge

Who Was Ona Judge? Virtual Kids Club Explores Her Life and Daring Escape to Freedom

Part of The Museum’s Black History Month Celebration this February
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