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Showing 161–170 of 1329 results for Virtual Tour of Washington's Field Headquarters
Image 011321 Liberty Tree Photo Credit Bluecadet 0

Virtual Museum Tour

Explore the Museum of the American Revolution’s Virtual Museum Tour to immerse yourself in the history of the nation's founding through 360-degree panoramic images, high-resolution images of objects and artifacts, and a guided audio tour.
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Liberty Exhibit Painting Index

This index of paintings will assist in navigating to specific paintings in the virtual tour of Liberty: Don Troiani's Paintings of the Revolutionary War.
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Michael Idriss Mother Bethel Ame Walking Tour

Mother Bethel AME Virtual Walking Tour

Join the Museum's African American Interpretive Fellow, Michael Idriss, for a virtual tour of the historic Mother Bethel AME Church in Philadelphia.
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A screenshot of a 360-degree panoramic image from the Black Founders virtual tour.

New 360-Degree Virtual Tour of Groundbreaking Special Exhibit "Black Founders: The Forten Family of Philadelphia" Now Available

With a newly launched virtual tour, people from across the globe can now experience a 360-degree walkthrough of the Museum of the American Revolution’s groundbreaking current special exhibition, Black Founders: The Forten Family of Philadelphia.
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Liberty Virtual Tour at Battles Of 1776 Stop

New 360-Degree Virtual Tour of Special Exhibit “Liberty: Don Troiani’s Paintings of the Revolutionary War” Now Available

With a newly launched virtual tour, people from across the globe can now experience a 360-degree walkthrough of the Museum of the American Revolution’s current special exhibition, Liberty: Don Troiani’s Paintings of the Revolutionary War.
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Finding Freedom: Eve - Peyton Randolph’s Will

Peyton Randolph, a politician and plantation owner from Williamsburg, Virginia, wrote his will on August 10, 1774, one year before he died. Randolph, a slave owner, requested that the people he enslaved were to be inherited by his wife Elizabeth and other family members, or, if necessary, be sold to pay off his debts. Elizabeth Randolph was to receive four enslaved women and their children, including Eve and George, upon her husband’s death.

This historical record is dedicated to the Museum of the American Revolution by the York County-Poquoson Circuit Court, Authorized by the Honorable Kristen N. Nelson, Clerk

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Finding Freedom: Eve - Lord Dunmore’s Proclamation

On November 14, 1775, Virginia’s Royal Governor Lord Dunmore published this proclamation in Williamsburg that freed “all indented Servants, Negroes, or others, (appertaining to Rebels,) … that are able and willing to bear Arms” for the King. Eve and her son George were among the 800 or so enslaved people who fled to Lord Dunmore as the news spread.

Dunmore’s Proclamation, A 1775 .V55, Albert and Shirley Small Special Collections Library, University of Virginia

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Image 101220 Foop George Washingtons Replica War Tent

First Oval Office Project

Learn more about the Museum's handsewn, full-scale replica of General George Washington's mobile Revolutionary War headquarters tents.
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General George Washington's Revolutionary War headquarters tent on display at the Museum

Member Morning: Witness to Revolution Special Exhibit Tour

March 3, 2024, at 9:30 a.m.
Museum Members are invited to join a Museum educator for a tour of our newest special exhibition, Witness to Revolution: The Unlikely Travels of Washington's Tent.
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Finding Freedom: London - Robert Pleasants’s Letter to Benedict Arnold

On January 30, 1781, London’s former owner, Robert Pleasants, wrote this letter to British Brigadier General Benedict Arnold, the American turncoat. Pleasants described how he valued London and wanted him to be returned. Soldiers from Arnold’s army had encamped near Pleasants’s plantation, called “Curles Neck,” earlier that month and may have persuaded London and his uncle, Carter Jack, to join them. London never returned to the Pleasants’s plantation. 

Robert Pleasants Letterbook, Special Collections Research Center, Swem Library, College of William and Mary

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