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Showing 111–120 of 1016 results for Virtual Tour of Washington's Field Headquarters
Image 101220 Foop George Washingtons Replica War Tent

First Oval Office Project

Learn more about the Museum's handsewn, full-scale replica of General George Washington's mobile Revolutionary War headquarters tents.
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I Survived Field Trip Video Still

Beyond the Battlefield: A Virtual Field Trip

Take a virtual field trip, presented in partnership with Scholastic, to the Museum with author of the I Survived series Lauren Tarshis.
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Finding Freedom: Deborah - George Washington’s Letter to Lund Washington

On April 30, 1781, General George Washington wrote this letter to Lund Washington, his cousin and farm manager, to express his disgust with Lund Washington’s decision to supply the British when they came to Mount Vernon earlier that month. In General Washington’s absence, Lund Washington convinced the British to spare the plantation from being destroyed by providing them with food and supplies. General Washington wrote in response, “It would have been a less painful circumstance to me, to have heard…they had burnt my House, & laid the Plantation in Ruins.” Lund Washington’s negotiation saved the property, but General Washington felt his honor had been tarnished by giving in to the enemy. The departure of 17 enslaved people, including Deborah, only worsened Washington’s embarrassment. Although the British left Washington’s plantation untouched, they burned many neighboring properties.

George Washington Papers, Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, DC

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Finding Freedom: Andrew - Revolutionary War Pension Application

On August 15, 1838, Andrew Ferguson told the story of his military service during the Revolutionary War at the courthouse in Monroe County, Indiana. This document records his story and the testimony of people who could verify Ferguson’s claims. Ferguson told his story in order to apply for a veteran’s pension (financial assistance) from the United States Government. Six years earlier, in 1832, Congress passed a law that allowed men who had served at least two years in the Continental army, militia, or navy during the war to apply for lifetime pensions. Following the application requirements, Andrew Ferguson appeared before his local court and described his military service under oath. Ferguson described himself as a “colored man” from Virginia who had served at battles such as King’s Mountain, Guilford Courthouse, and Eutaw Springs. His application was successful, and he began to receive payments the following year.

National Archives and Records Administration, Washington, DC/Fold3.com

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Museum of the American Revolution Launches Virtual Museum Tour

A newly launched virtual tour of the Museum of the American Revolution allows people from across the globe to experience the Museum’s award-winning, immersive galleries through 360-degree, high-resolution images.
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Finding Freedom: Deborah - Marquis de Lafayette’s Letter to George Washington

General George Washington received this confidential letter from the Marquis de Lafayette a few weeks after a British ship sailed up the Potomac River and took supplies from Mount Vernon, Washington’s home in Virginia. Lafayette informed General Washington that several enslaved people had escaped from Mount Vernon to join the British in search of their freedom. He also noted that Lund Washington, the general’s cousin and farm manager, had boarded the enemy’s vessel and offered to provide the British with supplies to prevent Mount Vernon from being burned down. Lafayette warned General Washington that this might make his neighbors upset because they had attempted to resist the British and their homes were burned as a result. On April 30, 1781, General Washington wrote a letter to Lund Washington to criticize his cousin’s decision to give supplies to the British. General Washington felt his honor had been tarnished by giving in to the enemy.

George Washington Papers, Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, DC

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General Irvin McDowell and staff, Arlington House
General Irvin McDowell and staff, Arlington House. United States Virginia, 1862. Photograph. https://www.loc.gov/item/2008680204/.

Washington's War Tent During the Civil War: Behind Closed Doors

This is the second in a three-part series describing the fate of General George Washington's Headquarters Tent during the Civil War.
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Arlington House circa 1868 via Library Of Congress
Gedney, J. F., Engraver, and Publisher W.H. & O.H. Morrison. Arlington House. Arlington Virginia, 1868. [Washington, D.C.: Published by W.H. & O.H. Morrison, Washn.: print by J. Gedney, Washn] Photograph.

Washington's War Tent During the Civil War: Surviving the Civil War

This is the first in a three-part series describing the fate of General George Washington's Headquarters Tent during the Civil War.
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Liberty Virtual Tour at Battles Of 1776 Stop

New 360-Degree Virtual Tour of Special Exhibit “Liberty: Don Troiani’s Paintings of the Revolutionary War” Now Available

With a newly launched virtual tour, people from across the globe can now experience a 360-degree walkthrough of the Museum of the American Revolution’s current special exhibition, Liberty: Don Troiani’s Paintings of the Revolutionary War.
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Image 011321 Liberty Tree Photo Credit Bluecadet 0

Virtual Museum Tour

Explore the Museum of the American Revolution’s Virtual Museum Tour to immerse yourself in the history of the nation's founding through 360-degree panoramic images, high-resolution images of objects and artifacts, and a guided audio tour.
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