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Showing 151–160 of 1493 results for Cost of Revolution Online Exhibit
Image 091020 3x2 Irish Volunteer Jug
© National Museums NI Collection Ulster Museum

Art and Artifacts in Cost of Revolution

Discover the art and artifacts that brought Richard St. George's story to life in Cost of Revolution.
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Image 2923 Patriots Of Color Archive

Ancestry and Museum of the American Revolution Launch Free Digitized Archive Connected to Black and Native American Soldiers from the Revolutionary War

Nearly 200 rare documents bearing the names of Black and Native American soldiers who served in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War are now accessible online to everyone at no cost, thanks to a partnership between Philadelphia’s Museum of the American Revolution and Ancestry, the global leader in family history.
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This image depicts the book cover for Cost of Revolution: The Life and Death of an Irish Soldier. This is a catalog of a limited run Museum exhibition. The cover shows two portraits of Richard St. George.

Cost of Revolution

Read an excerpt from the Museum of the American Revolution's Cost of Revolution: The Life and Death of an Irish Soldier exhibition catalog.
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Finding Freedom: Eve - Lord Dunmore’s Proclamation

On November 14, 1775, Virginia’s Royal Governor Lord Dunmore published this proclamation in Williamsburg that freed “all indented Servants, Negroes, or others, (appertaining to Rebels,) … that are able and willing to bear Arms” for the King. Eve and her son George were among the 800 or so enslaved people who fled to Lord Dunmore as the news spread.

Dunmore’s Proclamation, A 1775 .V55, Albert and Shirley Small Special Collections Library, University of Virginia

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Finding Freedom: London - Robert Pleasants’s Letter to Benedict Arnold

On January 30, 1781, London’s former owner, Robert Pleasants, wrote this letter to British Brigadier General Benedict Arnold, the American turncoat. Pleasants described how he valued London and wanted him to be returned. Soldiers from Arnold’s army had encamped near Pleasants’s plantation, called “Curles Neck,” earlier that month and may have persuaded London and his uncle, Carter Jack, to join them. London never returned to the Pleasants’s plantation. 

Robert Pleasants Letterbook, Special Collections Research Center, Swem Library, College of William and Mary

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Finding Freedom: Andrew - Additional Revolutionary War Pension Deposition

One year after he initially applied for a Revolutionary War pension from the United States Government, Andrew Ferguson returned to the courthouse in Monroe County, Indiana, to share more details about his military service during the war. This document records his additional testimony. Ferguson declared that he had hoped to apply for a pension 17 years earlier in response to Congress’s 1818 law that allowed impoverished Revolutionary War veterans to apply for financial support from the United States Government. However, at the time, Ferguson was told that “a Colored man could not get a pension.” Many veterans of African descent applied for and received pensions according to the 1818 legislation, but they encountered racial discrimination and intimidation during the application process.

National Archives and Records Administration, Washington, DC/Fold3.com

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A watercolor depicts Deborah and Harry, with their backs to the viewer, aboard a ship setting sail for Nova Scotia. They look out on men and women in the streets fighting for their freedom, as the Americans won the war. Many people were fighting for a place on the ships that were evacuating Loyalists.

Interactive Features

Dig deeper into compelling stories and complex events of the American Revolution through our interactive online learning experiences, Finding Freedom and Season of Independence.
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The British Are Coming Back! Living History Weekend Recreates the British Occupation of Philadelphia, Sept. 28-29

Two-day recreation the British occupation of Philadelphia, coinciding with the opening of Cost of Revolution: Life and Death of an Irish Solider.
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Cover for the Museum's Black Founders exhibit catalog featuring a portrait of James Forten.

Black Founders

Read an excerpt from the Museum of the American Revolution's exhibit book, Black Founders: The Forten Family of Philadelphia.
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A painting of Washington at the Battle of Princeton, 1777
Courtesy Don Troiani

AmRev Quizzo: Ten Crucial Days! with The American Battlefield Trust

December 16, 2021 from 6-7:30 p.m.
Join staff from the Museum of the American Revolution and the American Battlefield Trust for online history Quizzo.
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