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Showing 41–50 of 304 results for Black Founders

When Women Lost the Vote: A Revolutionary Story: Montgomery Township, Somerset County, New Jersey, October 1801

Montgomery Township
Somerset County, New Jersey
October 13, 1801
Ink on Paper 

This poll list is from an 1801 state election held at the Rocky Hill Inn in Montgomery Township, Somerset County. The election determined annual officeholders for the New Jersey State Assembly and Legislative Council, and for the Somerset County Sheriff and Coroner. The town officers presiding over the election included one judge, Robert Stockton, the town clerk, Frederick Cruser, and two poll inspectors, Hendrick VanDike, also known as Colonel Henry VanDike, and Thomas Skillman. 

The poll list includes the names of 343 total voters. At least 46 of these voters are women, accounting for nearly 14 percent of the voters on the list. It also includes the names of at least four free Black male voters, one of whom is identified as Black on the poll list with the word “negro” in parentheses next to his name. 

Like the rest of Somerset County, Montgomery Township voted Federalist in 1801. Most voters in the township supported Federalists Peter D. Vroom for Legislative Council; William MacEowen, James Van Duyn, and Frederick Frelinghuysen for General Assembly; and Peter Stryker for sheriff. The voting results for coroner are lost.

Note: The names recorded on this poll list were written by an election official, not by the voters themselves. The spelling of each voter’s name on the poll list may be different compared to how that same person’s name is spelled in other historical records and by the Museum of the American Revolution.

Images: New Jersey State Archives, Department of State

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Finding Freedom: Andrew - Claim for Increase in Revolutionary War Pension Payment

Andrew Ferguson traveled west to Knox County, Indiana, in 1844 to apply for an increase in his Revolutionary War pension payments due to the growing pain of his wartime injuries. This written record documents his testimony given at the county courthouse and the support Ferguson’s application received from a fellow Black veteran named Daniel Strother. According to his testimony, Ferguson was wounded in the leg at the Battle of Camden in 1780 and in the head at the Battle of Guilford Courthouse in 1781. Two doctors examined Ferguson following his testimony and agreed that his injuries prevented him from earning a living from manual labor. The doctors supported his claim for an increase in his pension payments, but the United States Government denied Ferguson’s request. 

National Archives and Records Administration, Washington, DC/Fold3.com

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When Women Lost the Vote: A Revolutionary Story

Explore the Museum's new When Women Lost the Vote: A Revolutionary Story, 1776-1807 online exhibit to learn the little-known history of the nation’s first women voters.
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Finding Freedom: Deborah - “Muster Book of Free Black Settlement of Birchtown,” Page 40

When Deborah arrived in Nova Scotia in 1783, she was one of many newly freed people of African descent who helped settle Birchtown, a town named for British Brigadier General Samuel Birch. This page from a 1784 census, or list of residents, documents the men and women who lived in Birchtown the year after the town’s founding. Deborah’s name, recorded as Deborah Lynch, can be found near the bottom of the page on the left side. Harry, her husband listed in the 1783 “Inspection Roll of Negroes,” is not included in this census. He may have died due to the harsh conditions and bad weather that the settlers faced. Deborah likely took the last name Lynch because Harry had been owned by a Loyalist named Lynch, whom Deborah also lived with for a short time. In this document, Deborah is listed as a member of the household of a man named Neil Robinson. No other details about their relationship status are currently known.

“Muster Book of Free Black Settlement of Birchtown,” 1784, Library and Archives Canada, MG 9 B9-14, item 1292

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Image 090123 Event Amrev Presents Black Founders Legacy Entrepreneurship

Local Business Leaders Join the Museum to Explore Philadelphia’s Legacy of Black Entrepreneurship at Evening Panel Discussion, Oct. 19

A panel of five Philadelphia-based Black business leaders will join the Museum of the American Revolution on Thursday, Oct. 19, 2023, from 6 p.m. – 7:30 p.m. for “AmRev Presents: A Black Founders Legacy of Entrepreneurship,” a panel discussion on the history of Black entrepreneurship in Philadelphia. Panelists will explore the experiences of contemporary Black business owners and draw connections to those of James Forten, a successful Black sailmaker and entrepreneur whose life and legacy is chronicled in the Museum’s special exhibit Black Founders: The Forten Family of Philadelphia.
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Photo of child at an exhibit

Museum Exhibits

Learn more about the Museum's current, upcoming, and past core and special exhibitions, including our upcoming special exhibit, Black Founders: The Forten Family of Philadelphia.
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A painted portrait of James Forten is installed next to a small photograph of his wife Charlotte Vandine Forten in the Museum's Black Founders exhibit.

Triumphant Lives: The Forten Legacy Fosters Scholarship and Historical Insight

Dr. Janice L. Sumler-Edmond recounts the past 50 years of academic scholarship on James Forten and his descendants that helped lead to the Museum's Black Founders special exhibition.
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Forten Family Bible Courtesy Of Atwood Kip Forten Jacobs

Historic Forten Family Bible Donated to Museum of the American Revolution by Descendants of James Forten

An historic Bible, connected to one of the most significant African American families in Philadelphia’s history, has been donated to the Museum of the American Revolution by Atwood “Kip” Forten Jacobs and his daughter Taylor Jacqueline Rodriguez Jacobs, direct descendants of Black Revolutionary War veteran and abolitionist James Forten. The Bible is currently on display – for the first time in public – in the Museum’s special exhibition Black Founders: The Forten Family of Philadelphia.
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Discovering Black Voters in Early New Jersey

Discovering Black Voters in Early New Jersey with Elaine Buck and Beverly Mills

In February 2021, Stoutsburg Sourland African American Museum founders Elaine Buck and Beverly Mills joined the Museum for a virtual discussion about early Black voters in New Jersey, including Ephraim Hagerman and Thomas Blue, and their legacies today in Montgomery Township.
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Margaretta Forten Sampler on display in Black Founders exhibit.
Courtesy of Marcus and Lorri Huey

SOLD OUT | Artisan Workshop: Make a Sampler

March 8, 15, 22, 2023 (3 weeks) from 7-8:30 p.m.
Join us for this three-part virtual workshop to learn about 18th-century sewing and how to make your own embroidered sampler based on original examples on display in our special exhibit, Black Founders: The Forten Family of Philadelphia.
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