Get free shipping on online orders from the Museum Shop through Dec. 15 with promo code HOLIDAYSHIPPING. Shop Now

Dismiss notification
Showing 371–380 of 1748 results

Cost of Revolution: Anna Seward

Read More

Cost of Revolution: Wife and Child

Read More

Cost of Revolution: Fuseli’s “The Apotheosis of Penelope Boothby”

Read More

Cost of Revolution: Mourning Portrait

Read More

Cost of Revolution: Why Richard Mansergh St. George?

Read More

Cost of Revolution: Battle of Paoli

Painted by Xavier della Gatta, 1782

Richard Mansergh St. George remembered Paoli as a “nocturnal bloody scene” and helped create the detailed painting of the battle reproduced here. The painting merges different moments from the battle into one action-packed view. It provides a rare, eyewitness glimpse into the violence of the Revolutionary War.

Museum of the American Revolution

Read More

Cost of Revolution: Battle of Germantown

Painted by Xavier della Gatta, 1782

Richard Mansergh St. George worked with Italian artist Xavier della Gatta to create the painting of the Battle of Germantown reproduced here. The painting merges different actions into one scene, including the moment Richard Mansergh St. George was carried off the battlefield after he was wounded.

Museum of the American Revolution 

Read More

Cost of Revolution: Artifacts of the United Irishmen

Read More

Cost of Revolution: Part 3 Wounded Veteran

Richard Mansergh St. George returned home to Ireland in 1778 physically and emotionally scarred from combat. His traumatic war experience tortured him. St. George’s wound gave him constant pain, made him hallucinate, and caused him to have “fits of insanity.” The death of his wife in 1792, four years into their marriage, magnified his agony. In moments of darkness, St. George used art to manage his “painful remembrances.” An emerging art movement called Romanticism offered St. George a way to express his suffering. As a direct response to the Enlightenment, the growing Industrial Revolution, and the violence of war and revolution, Romanticism emphasized the power of human emotion. Instead of painting realistic landscapes or scenes from the Bible or history, Romantic artists painted love, pain, and fantasy. Such art appealed to Richard Mansergh St. George's wounded heart and soul.
Read More

Cost of Revolution: “Murdered by the Rebels”

Read More
38 of 175 pages