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Showing 331–340 of 1746 results

Cost of Revolution: Outfitting an Officer

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Cost of Revolution: 4th Regiment of Foot Commission

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Cost of Revolution: St. George’s Battles

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Cost of Revolution: Lieutenant Richard Mansergh St. George

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Cost of Revolution: Protectors of Liberty

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Cost of Revolution: Irish Volunteers Flag

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Cost of Revolution: Americans and the United Irishmen

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Cost of Revolution: Wolfe Tone’s United Irishmen Membership Certificate

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Meet the Figures: Oneida Nation Theater: Two Kettles Together

Tyonajanegen, also known as Two Kettles Together, was an Oneida woman who married Han Yerry in the 1750s and settled at the village of Oriska. By 1777, they managed a large farm, lived in a frame house, and owned a significant number of livestock, as some of the wealthiest local Oneida. On Aug. 2, 1777, she carried word into the countryside that the British and their Native allies were surrounding Revolutionary-held Fort Schuyler. On Aug. 6, at the Battle of Oriskany, Tyonajanegen fought alongside her husband, first with two pistols and then loading for him after he was wounded, an incident which appeared in period newspapers. Other British-allied Haudenosaunee/Iroquois destroyed their farm in retribution. Tyonajanegen lived into the 1820s.

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Meet the Figures: Oneida Nation Theater: Han Yerry

Han Yerry was born about 1724 to a Mohawk mother and a German father (he was also known by Han Yerry Doxtader, referring to his part-German ancestry), though he considered himself an Oneida and became chief warrior of the nation’s Wolf Clan. He was “ordinary sized” and “quite a gentleman in his demeanor.” At the outbreak of the war, he mustered Oneida warriors to support the Revolutionary cause. After Oriskany, Han Yerry was part of the Oneida party that travelled to Valley Forge, where he had a personal dinner with George Washington. In 1779, he was one of a number of Oneida and Tuscarora warriors who received officers’ commissions from Congress (he was made a captain). He remained a leader after the war and died around 1794. 

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