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Showing 291–300 of 2151 results

Cost of Revolution: The Nightmare

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Cost of Revolution: Richard St. George’s Nightmare?

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Cost of Revolution: Fuseli’s “Urma”

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Cost of Revolution: Anna Seward’s Poem about Richard St. George

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Cost of Revolution: Part 1 St. George’s Ireland

Richard Mansergh St. George grew up in the 1750s as a member of one of Ireland’s wealthy, Protestant, land-owning families. At the time, Ireland was part of the British Empire and under the rule of the British Crown. The Irish Parliament and the Lord Lieutenant (who represented the British monarch) governed the country, but the British Parliament could also make laws for Ireland. Members of the Protestant Church of Ireland dominated the country’s social, economic, and political power. St. George’s family belonged to this minority of the Irish population, which became known as the “Protestant Ascendancy.” His family owned thousands of acres of Irish land and accumulated money from rents paid by tenant farmers. Richard Mansergh St. George’s grandfather, General Richard St. George, was a senior officer in the British Army stationed in Ireland and increased the St. George family’s prominence. As a boy in County Galway, Richard Mansergh St. George lived in medieval stone towers, rode horses through emerald green pastures, developed artistic talents, and learned to be a gentleman. As a young adult, he inherited his family’s land and the power it represented.
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Cost of Revolution: Battle of the Boyne

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Cost of Revolution: Mansergh and St. George Families

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Cost of Revolution: Grandfather’s Portrait

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Cost of Revolution: General St. George’s Coat

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Cost of Revolution: Dublin Hellfire Club

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