The Museum is open daily, 10 a.m. - 5 p.m., with health and safety protocols in place. Plan Your Visit

Dismiss notification
Showing 261–270 of 1576 results

Picturing Washington's Army: Verplanck’s Point | Parade Ground

Take a closer look at the area where the Continental Army showed its professionalism to the French. The tents of the New York and New Jersey troops are visible here, as well as Stony Point across the Hudson River.

Image: Museum of the American Revolution, Gift of the Landenberger Family Foundation 

Read More

Picturing Washington's Army: Artillery Park

Read More

Picturing Washington's Army: West Point | Hudson Highlands

Take a closer look at the outlying defenses on the rocky hills and cliffs south of West Point. Notice the Hudson River in the foreground and the Continental Army’s hilltop fortifications. 

Image courtesy of Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Washington, D.C. 

Read More

Picturing Washington's Army: West Point | Headquarters

Take a closer look at the buildings and parade ground at West Point. Cadets at the United States Military Academy continue to train on the same ground where the Continental Army encamped during the Revolutionary War. 

Image courtesy of Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Washington, D.C. 

Read More

Picturing Washington's Army: West Point | Continental Army

Take a closer look at a group of soldiers in the foreground of the painting. Also notice the lines of tents in the distance with the Hudson Highlands in the background. 

Image courtesy of Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Washington, D.C. 

Read More

Picturing Washington's Army: New Jersey Brigade

Read More

Finding Freedom: London - Birch Pass

In the terms of the surrender to the Americans, the British were to return all captured property—including human property. The British did not adhere to this stipulation, and instead evacuated thousands of free and formerly enslaved men and women to Canada. Birch Passes, named for British Brigadier General Samuel Birch, were given to those who could prove they sought the protection of the British forces during the war. The passes, such as this example, guaranteed a place on a departing ship. London may have received one. Cato Rammsay, an enslaved man who escaped from Norfolk, Virginia, received this Birch Pass that allowed him to go to Nova Scotia as a free person.

Passport for Cato Ramsay to emigrate to Nova Scotia, 21 April 1783; NSA, Gideon White fonds, MG 1 vol. 948 no. 196

View Transcription

Read More

Finding Freedom: London - Robert Pleasants’s Letter to Benedict Arnold

On January 30, 1781, London’s former owner, Robert Pleasants, wrote this letter to British Brigadier General Benedict Arnold, the American turncoat. Pleasants described how he valued London and wanted him to be returned. Soldiers from Arnold’s army had encamped near Pleasants’s plantation, called “Curles Neck,” earlier that month and may have persuaded London and his uncle, Carter Jack, to join them. London never returned to the Pleasants’s plantation. 

Robert Pleasants Letterbook, Special Collections Research Center, Swem Library, College of William and Mary

View Transcription

Read More
Image 090120 Wwltv Event Image

Opening Weekend: When Women Lost the Vote

October 2-4, 2020
Join the Museum for the opening weekend of the opening of our groundbreaking special exhibition.
Go to Event
Two male adolescents, sporting military clothes provided in Revolution Place, pose for a picture one of their parental guardians is taking on their iPhone. They have their arms around each other’s shoulders.

A Revolutionary Halloweekend at the Museum

October 30 - November 1, 2020
A Revolutionary Halloweekend at the Museum is included with regular Museum admission.
Go to Event
27 of 158 pages