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When Women Lost the Vote: A Revolutionary Story: Exploring New Jersey Voters, 1800 - 1807

As of 2020, the Museum of the American Revolution has identified 163 women voters named on nine poll lists dated between 1800 - 1807 from across New Jersey. Of these voters, we have compiled biographies of nearly 30 women and free people of color who voted in these elections. These biographies provide a glimpse into the voters’ lives — their families, religions, homes, ownership of property, and roles in their communities. More biographies will be added as our research continues!

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When Women Lost the Vote: A Revolutionary Story: Grace Gaw Nicholson Little

Originally from Philadelphia, former tavern keeper Grace Little lived as a widow in Princeton when she voted. Her property included a farm, livestock, and three enslaved people named Judith, Phebe, and John.
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When Women Lost the Vote: A Revolutionary Story: Ruth Carle Elberson

Ruth Carle voted as a single woman. She was the sister of Continental Army veteran Ephraim Taylor Carle.
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When Women Lost the Vote: A Revolutionary Story: Amy Walker Cheston

Amy Cheston owned 20 acres of land and some livestock when she voted as a widow in Montgomery Township. She lived until 1841 when she died at the age of 97.
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When Women Lost the Vote: A Revolutionary Story: Elizabeth Mattison

Elizabeth (Betsy) Mattison was a member of the Presbyterian Church of Princeton (now the Nassau Presbyterian Church). She died in 1806, five years after she voted.
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When Women Lost the Vote: A Revolutionary Story: Mary Wade Norris

Mary Norris lived in Princeton as a widow from 1789 to 1813. She was 55 when she voted. Norris is buried in Princeton Cemetery.
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When Women Lost the Vote: A Revolutionary Story: Nancy Oppie

Nancy Oppie, the daughter of William and Mary Oppie of Rocky Hill, New Jersey, voted as a single woman in 1801.
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When Women Lost the Vote: A Revolutionary Story: Elizabeth Stryker Skillman

Of Dutch ancestry, Elizabeth Skillman was a member of the Harlingen Dutch Reformed Church in Somerset County. She owned a 220-acre farm following her husband’s death in 1796. She voted as a widow in 1801.
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When Women Lost the Vote: A Revolutionary Story: Alexander Hamilton

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When Women Lost the Vote: A Revolutionary Story: The Bloomfields

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